Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Practical Ways To Build Your Vocabulary

If a psychologist were asked to estimate your chances for success, what would he first want to know about you?  

Your family background? Your educational record? Your personality traits? No. The first thing he would want to know is the extent of our vocabulary.

Psychologists have found that the extent of a person’s vocabulary is the most important single factor correlating with success not just scholastic success, mind you, but success on the job as well.

Surveys by Johnson O’ Connor’s Human Engineering Laboratory, an aptitude testing institution located in eight United States cities, Mexico, and Canada, indicate that a superior vocabulary is more likely to accompany occupational success than any other measurable trait.

When O’Connor gave vocabulary tests to executive and supervisory personnel in 39 large industrial plants, he obtained eye-opening results.

Out of a possible total of 272 points, the following average scores were achieved:

Presidents and vice presidents .................... 236
Managers ..................................................... 168
Superintendents ............................................140
Foremen .........................................................114
Floor Bosses ....................................................86

Top business executives actually outscored college and university professors by a narrow margin.

Surely, it is no accident that in almost every case the extent of a person’s vocabulary correlated with executive level and mcome.

In view of this, it seems absurd that the average American adult, through lack of effort, adds only about 50 new words a year to his vocabulary. Why is it that vocabulary building often ends, for all practical purposes, after high school or college? They are reasons for it, of course-all of them bad. Adults are just as capable of learning new words as children, and they have a real professional and social stake in doing so. 
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